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en:vendor-lock-in [2014/10/19 13:56]
garydean
en:vendor-lock-in [2014/10/24 20:49] (current)
garydean
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 ===== What is "​Vendor Lock-in"?​ ===== ===== What is "​Vendor Lock-in"?​ =====
  
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 //"​Rather than comparing war to art we could more accurately compare it to commerce, which is also a conflict of human interests and activities; and it is still closer to politics, which in turn may be considered as a kind of commerce on a larger scale."//​ - Carl Von Clausewitz, in On War, Book I, Chapter 3. //"​Rather than comparing war to art we could more accurately compare it to commerce, which is also a conflict of human interests and activities; and it is still closer to politics, which in turn may be considered as a kind of commerce on a larger scale."//​ - Carl Von Clausewitz, in On War, Book I, Chapter 3.
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 In this scenario, open source solutions provide a much better outcome. The organisations that provides such solutions have no vested interest in locking a customer into their solutions. There is no profit motive attached. There are no shareholders to satisfy. Open source suppliers are driven by far different motivations. The programmers and engineers working on such solutions, while undoubtedly motivated by their own needs; for recognition,​ advancement,​ even glory; eventually come together to provide only one thing, a superior product. Open source organisations can easily accommodate unique customer needs because the option is open to customers to add their own code   to the open source library which they are not obligated to share except by their own decision. In this scenario, open source solutions provide a much better outcome. The organisations that provides such solutions have no vested interest in locking a customer into their solutions. There is no profit motive attached. There are no shareholders to satisfy. Open source suppliers are driven by far different motivations. The programmers and engineers working on such solutions, while undoubtedly motivated by their own needs; for recognition,​ advancement,​ even glory; eventually come together to provide only one thing, a superior product. Open source organisations can easily accommodate unique customer needs because the option is open to customers to add their own code   to the open source library which they are not obligated to share except by their own decision.
  
-See also [[ http://​en.wikipedia.org/​wiki/​Vendor_lock-in|Vendor lock-in ]].+See also [[wp>Vendor_lock-in|Vendor lock-in]].